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Review Of Rower Machine X-Row





Review Of Rower Machine X-Row 250 - Bookshelf


224 pages

Rowing After the White Whale, A Crossing of the Indian Ocean by Hand

Creator: James Adair | Biography & Autobiography - 2013-04-18

Always do sober what you said you'd do drunk. That will teach you to keep your mouth shut' - Ernest Hemingway Over a boozy Sunday lunch, flatmates James Adair and Ben Stenning made a promise to row across the ocean.

Publisher: Birlinn

About this book
Always do sober what you said you'd do drunk. That will teach you to keep your mouth shut' - Ernest Hemingway Over a boozy Sunday lunch, flatmates James Adair and Ben Stenning made a promise to row across the ocean. At first they considered the Pacific, then the Atlantic, but once James Cracknell and Ben Fogle completed the high-profile Atlantic Rowing Race, their thoughts turned to the Indian Ocean, longer and tougher than the Atlantic and having seen fewer people row across its waters than have walked on the Moon. After years of planning and fund raising, they were ready to launch in Spring 2011. Neither James nor Ben had any rowing or sailing experience. To add to this, James had contracted Guillain-Barre syndrome at the age of 14, which had locked his body into total paralysis for three months (while his mind had remained completely active) and which had left him with paralysed feet. This was a challenge that neither man should have ever considered.



283 pages

Working Out Sucks! (And Why It Doesn't Have To), The Only 21-Day Kick-Start Plan for Total Health and Fitness You'll Ever Need

Creator: Chuck Runyon | Health & Fitness - 2012

Chuck Runyon, Brian Zehetner, and Rebecca DeRossett are here to confirm what you already know: Working out sucks. The good news? With the new approaches in this book, that is about to change.

Publisher: Da Capo Press

About this book
Tired of diet books that promise to change your life in five minutes? Tired of trying to get healthy and fit—and really getting nowhere? Chuck Runyon, Brian Zehetner, and Rebecca DeRossett are here to confirm what you already know: Working out sucks. The good news? With the new approaches in this book, that is about to change. Working Out Sucks! deprograms those of us who have long been brainwashed by unhealthy habits, destructive attitudes, and misinformation about health, and offers a no-nonsense way to get back on track. Because, while working out may suck, the alternatives—from heart disease to premature aging and shortened lifespan--are a lot worse. As he does in his 1,700 Anytime Fitness clubs (with more than one million members worldwide--and growing), Runyon emphasizes user-friendliness and utility in this get-real, get-healthy message, complete with Zehetner’s 21-day kick-start plan and DeRossett’s tips for mental health.



80 pages

Gondola

Creator: Donna Leon | Music - 2015-03-10

Please note, this e-book edition does not include the audio recordings of Venetian barcarole. Of all the trademarks of Venice, none is more ubiquitous than the gondola.

Publisher: Grove/Atlantic, Inc.

About this book
Please note, this e-book edition does not include the audio recordings of Venetian barcarole.Of all the trademarks of Venice, none is more ubiquitous than the gondola. In this beautifully illustrated collection, internationally bestselling author Donna Leon tells fascinating stories about these famous boats. First used in medieval Venice as an easily maneuverable getaway boat, the gondola evolved over the centuries into a floating pleasure palace that facilitated the romantic escapades of the Venetian elite. Now a tourist favorite, the gondola has never ceased to be a part of authentic Venice. Each boat’s 280 pieces are carefully fashioned in a maestro’s workshop—though Leon also recounts a tale of an American friend who decided to make a gondola all on his own, a feat that took five years to complete. But the gondola is a work of art well worth the labor, and no author is better poised to write about them than Leon, the “American with the Venetian heart” (Washington Post).